Archive for the ‘Music’ Category

30 Days of Hypnosis: Day 12

What’s your favorite pop culture reference about hypnosis?

Whew! So many possibilities.

The first one that comes to mind is “The Hypnotic Eye”. A movie about a sinister stage hypnotist who entrances his lovely subjects certainly plays to many of the public misconceptions regarding hypnosis, plus the producers had a professional stage hypnotist instruct the actor how to perform on camera as well as hypnotizing the actresses to go in to a trance on cue. Regrettably, it suffers from low public knowledge so it barely registers as a pop culture icon.

Another one that comes to mind is the classic spiral motif that so represents hypnosis in popular culture. That and the spooky, swirly music that seems to always accompany it in any advertisement or television episode scene transition. The same also goes for dangling crystals and staring eyes.

But I guess my favorite has to be “Trilby”. No other work so influenced the pop culture regarding hypnosis throughout its history. It is one of the few culture icons that directly influenced the English language, with the addition of “Svengali” as a term for a manipulative mentor.

A Holiday Treat — The (Physical) Hypnosis in Media Collection

As a special Holiday present, I present the (physical) Hypnosis in Media collection in its semi‐entirety.

The bookshelf unit here holds the main part of the Collection. As you can see, it is divided in half, with the left half holding figures and artwork behind the glass doors, larger books and folders below, and the doors below holding the media elements that don’t fit anywhere else. The right half holds most of the fiction and nonfiction books. As you can see, the bookcase is by no means large enough to hold everything, as there are parts of the collection on the floor before it.

This is the upper part of the left half, which has the figures and artwork. On the upper shelf you can see the two figures from the Silent Screams figure line, from the movie “The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari” on the top, along with the Princess Ariel figure, and smaller toys with hypnotic themes in the middle. At the back of the lower shelf as a animation cel of Hypnotia from the “Iron Man” animated series, several dozen HeroClix figures in the lower left and my latest acquisition, the Ringmaster mini‐bust, in the center. The boxes on the right contain a number of stereotypical hypnotic foci, including several crystals and even a couple of hypno‐disks. The HeroClix figures are a large but not complete of all of the characters with hypnotic or mind control abilities, including Professor X, Saturn Girl, Super‐Gorilla Grodd, the Puppet Master, the Mad Hatter, etc.

The folders and notebooks on the shelves below the  glass doors consists of the results of research projects carried out in the past, including the material behind the search for ‘Secrets of the Sleep Merchants’ detailed elsewhere, a set of publicity photographs of Pat Collins and details of her life, comic strip and book collections and reference materials, smaller magazines and pamphlets that might get damaged if put elsewhere, the two records released by Pat Collins, as well as anything that doesn’t fit in anywhere else.

The fiction part comprises roughly 200 pieces, including several collections, double‐stacked on the first two shelves and in front of the non‐fiction stacks on the third shelf.  The non‐fiction section also contains roughly about 200 books, not including the various pamphlets and booklets that are in another bookshelf. These books are strictly hypnosis related: there is a separate section for media references, such as indices and reference books on various TV series, movies, etc.

This is by no means the complete collection: there is a storage case with several dozen video tapes elsewhere that I am slowing digitizing and converting to DVD format, along with the comics collection stored in the garage, as well as the regular fiction collection that takes up most of another bedroom / library. All in all, I estimate I have somewhere in the range of 500 — 600 books, over 250 comics and dozens of magazines and papers in the collection proper and maybe another couple hundred books and I can’t even guess how many comics elsewhere.

Hypnotized’ by Fleetwood Mac

It’s the same kind of story
That seems to come down from long ago
Two friends having coffee together
When something flies by their window
It might be out on that lawn
Which is wide, at least half of a playing field
Because there’s no explaining what your imagination
Can make you see and feel

Seems like a dream
(They) got me hypnotized

[youtube zKYVFL_Kvzk]

One of Fleetwood Mac’s lesser hits, off the “Mystery to Me” album, ‘Hypnotized’ (written by Bob Welch) is a low‐key, slow‐tempo song, almost introspective in a way, but the almost dreamy aspect of the song lends itself well to the exposition of the subject of hypnosis.

[youtube sGq7Q8jAI5k]

References:

  • Link to complete lyrics

Hypnotized’ by Shanadoo

Hypnotized’ by European J‐rock band Shanadoo incorporates a number of hypnotic images, especially spirals (sometimes in the eyes of the singers.) It also uses a number of English words, including “hypnotized” in the lyrics.

[youtube WOKsnaa5V5w]

History: ‘Hypnotized’ was the group’s first original hit, even though its actual performance on the pop charts was less than expected: before this, they covered tracks from the German dance band E‐Rotic. Despite their Japanese origins they are a German and Japanese act, all of which makes the use of the English word “hypnotized” that much more interesting.

Commentary: It would be nice to know what they are singing about, but unfortunately I have not been able to find an English translation for the Japanese lyrics.

Addenda:

  • In this video, each of the singers are wearing the stereotypical Japanese school uniform look of white shirt, tie, skirt, high white socks and black shoes which is considered a fetish costume in Japan.

Pat Collins — “The Hip Hypnotist”

There have been many famous male stage hypnotists in the 20th Century, including Walford Bodie, Franz Polgar, Ormond McGill and Gil Boyne, but there has only been one female stage hypnotist with an equal amount of fame then.

That hypnotist was Pat Collins — “The Hyp Hypnotist”.

⇒ Continue reading “Pat Collins — “The Hip Hypnotist””

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